What is calcium propionate used for in food

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Children and teens who eat calcium-rich foods build up stores of calcium in their bones that help them maintain strong bones for life. By getting lots of calcium when you're young, you can make sure your body doesn't have to take too much from your bones. Bones have their own "calcium bank account," so "depositing" as much calcium as possible during your tween and teen years will help you reach your peak bone mass. By the end of the teen years, the account "closes"―you can't add any more calcium to your bones. You can only maintain what is already stored to help your bones stay healthy.

The main role of calcium in the body is to provide structure and strength to the skeleton. This structure is mainly provided by a form of calcium phosphate called hydroxyapatite crystals, which are found in collagen. Calcium ions on bone surfaces interact with those present in the bodily fluids, therefore enabling ion exchange. This is essential in maintaining the balance of calcium in the blood and bone. Calcium in the blood is an important regulator of key bodily processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse signalling, hormone signalling and blood coagulation.

Long-term intakes above the UL increase the risk of adverse health effects [ 1 ] (Table 4). Most reports suggest a toxicity threshold for vitamin D of 10,000 to 40,000 IU/day and serum 25(OH)D levels of 500–600 nmol/L (200–240 ng/mL). While symptoms of toxicity are unlikely at daily intakes below 10,000 IU/day, the FNB pointed to emerging science from national survey data, observational studies, and clinical trials suggesting that even lower vitamin D intakes and serum 25(OH)D levels might have adverse health effects over time. The FNB concluded that serum 25(OH)D levels above approximately 125–150 nmol/L (50–60 ng/mL) should be avoided, as even lower serum levels (approximately 75–120 nmol/L or 30–48 ng/mL) are associated with increases in all-cause mortality, greater risk of cancer at some sites like the pancreas, greater risk of cardiovascular events, and more falls and fractures among the elderly. The FNB committee cited research which found that vitamin D intakes of 5,000 IU/day achieved serum 25(OH)D concentrations between 100–150 nmol/L (40–60 ng/mL), but no greater. Applying an uncertainty factor of 20% to this intake value gave a UL of 4,000 IU which the FNB applied to children aged 9 and older, with corresponding lower amounts for younger children.

What is calcium propionate used for in food

what is calcium propionate used for in food

Long-term intakes above the UL increase the risk of adverse health effects [ 1 ] (Table 4). Most reports suggest a toxicity threshold for vitamin D of 10,000 to 40,000 IU/day and serum 25(OH)D levels of 500–600 nmol/L (200–240 ng/mL). While symptoms of toxicity are unlikely at daily intakes below 10,000 IU/day, the FNB pointed to emerging science from national survey data, observational studies, and clinical trials suggesting that even lower vitamin D intakes and serum 25(OH)D levels might have adverse health effects over time. The FNB concluded that serum 25(OH)D levels above approximately 125–150 nmol/L (50–60 ng/mL) should be avoided, as even lower serum levels (approximately 75–120 nmol/L or 30–48 ng/mL) are associated with increases in all-cause mortality, greater risk of cancer at some sites like the pancreas, greater risk of cardiovascular events, and more falls and fractures among the elderly. The FNB committee cited research which found that vitamin D intakes of 5,000 IU/day achieved serum 25(OH)D concentrations between 100–150 nmol/L (40–60 ng/mL), but no greater. Applying an uncertainty factor of 20% to this intake value gave a UL of 4,000 IU which the FNB applied to children aged 9 and older, with corresponding lower amounts for younger children.

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